Author Topic: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…  (Read 1248 times)

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Offline Jamers

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Re: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…
« Reply #20 on: October 06, 2020, 10:22:05 PM »
Test test

Offline morefoolyou

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Re: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…
« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2020, 06:45:34 AM »
Test test

echo  echo   ec ho     e c h o
The scientific consensus might, of course, be wrong. If the history of science teaches anything, it is humility. But our grandchildren will surely blame us if they find that we understood the reality of climate change and failed to do anything about it.

Offline morefoolyou

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Re: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…
« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2020, 05:26:26 PM »
can we call it?

I'm gonna call it now.

the season is officially a shitshow.

thanks roger.
The scientific consensus might, of course, be wrong. If the history of science teaches anything, it is humility. But our grandchildren will surely blame us if they find that we understood the reality of climate change and failed to do anything about it.

Offline morefoolyou

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Re: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…
« Reply #23 on: October 30, 2020, 06:14:39 AM »
Do Not Score! How to avoid touchdowns defenses celebrate

By RALPH D. RUSSO October 30, 2020 GMT



When the defense is celebrating having allowed a touchdown, something has most definitely gone wrong for the offense.

In two games last weekend, one college and one pro, the team with the ball scored when it was the last thing it wanted to do. Against a conceding opponent, whose only hope was to take advantage of a ball carrier’s natural inclination to find the end zone, Penn State and the Atlanta Falcons inadvertently took the bait and ended up losing games they pretty much had wrapped up.

For teams around the country this week, the failures of the Nittany Lions and Falcons could be turned into teachable moments about communication, preparation, and why it can be tricky to ask a player to go against his instincts.




“One of the things coaches do best is learn vicariously,” said former UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel, now an analyst for CBS Sports.

The situations varied a bit for Penn State and the Falcons.

Penn State had a one-point lead and the ball at the Indiana 14 with 1:47 left. On the first play, Indiana backed off and Nittany Lions running back Devyn Ford ran into the end zone, taking a couple of hesitant steps just as he got to the goal line, too late to stop himself. Indiana tied the game on their next possession and won in overtime.

Penn State coach James Franklin said after the game the offense had been made aware it was not supposed to score, but added it was on him if the message did not get across.

The Falcons had the ball at the Lions 10 and were down one with a little over a minute left. They wanted to advance the ball a bit, burn the clock and set up a winning field goal with no time left. Quarterback Matt Ryan told the huddle before the play to not score, but Todd Gurley had too much momentum after breaking through a half-hearted tackle attempt by a Lions defender and barely broke the goal line. The Lions ended up scoring the winning touchdown as time expired.

“Yeah, you talk about those things and you’ve got to be really locked in in the game in those moments, because those are critical decisions at critical times both as players and coaches,” Clemson’s Dabo Swinney said.

It is all about communication. Especially at the college level, where the less experienced players are more likely to get confused because they might never have been in one of these odd scenarios. Plus, in college, coaches don’t have as much time with players to go over rare in-game situations.




Former Auburn coach and current SEC Network analyst Gene Chizik said what happened at the end of the Penn State and Atlanta games are examples of what he calls “atypicals.”

He said he would have his staff give players film cut-ups straight from television broadcasts of unusual scenarios that could come up in pivotal moments of a game. It was a way to prepare players for what they would need to do and how it would be communicated during a tense moment.

“You have to have a system in place to make sure that you are giving the players a heads-up that that’s the situation we’re in,” Chizik said.

Former Georgia and Miami coach Mark Richt said when a team is letting an opponent score to get the ball back, ideally you want to speak directly to your offensive players. Preferably during a timeout instead of signaling in a play.

Most important, of course, is the guy with the ball knows what to do. Richt said in lieu of calling timeout the move would be to send in a running back off the sideline after a clear reminder to be aware of a defense in surrender-mode and to get down before the goal line.

“The most natural thing to do for a running back is to score a touchdown,” said Richt, now with the ACC Network.

Neuheisel said teams should just let the quarterback handle the ball in those situations. The more people involved, the more people that have to be told what to do, the more possibility things can go wrong.

“It’s like playing that game telephone or operator,” he said.

Falcons interim coach Raheem Morris laid blame on himself for Gurley’s touchdown, and offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter said the-get-as-much-as-you-can approach might not be the way to go.

“Maybe instead of not scoring the thing your practice is getting the ball where your kicker wants it and taking a knee,” Koetter said.

Neuheisel said it’s not worth the risk to run a play.

“When you tell them, ‘Get as much as you can without scoring,’ now it’s like you’re telling them to get close to the flame, but don’t touch it,” he said.

One thing is for sure, Chizik said. If a do-not-score situation comes up this week, coaches and players will be better prepared to stay out of the end zone.

“I promise you, across America this week, people worked on that and installed that if previously they had not,” he said.
The scientific consensus might, of course, be wrong. If the history of science teaches anything, it is humility. But our grandchildren will surely blame us if they find that we understood the reality of climate change and failed to do anything about it.

Offline morefoolyou

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Re: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…
« Reply #24 on: November 23, 2020, 06:21:33 AM »
On Football: About those rising NFL teams, never mind.

By BARRY WILNER November 23, 2020 GMT


Mediocrity is mediocrity. You can’t hide it, especially in the NFC East, where being mediocre is a compliment.

This, however, isn’t about those weaklings. It’s about teams many thought might be making moves toward relevance in the standings: New England, Minnesota, San Francisco, Chicago. Maybe even Detroit and Atlanta.

Never mind.

Thanksgiving week is here, which means the stretch run to the playoffs is at hand. Even with the extra wild card in each conference, it’s a pipe dream to rely on those half-dozen teams.

Neither the 49ers (4-6),  the most injury-ravaged team in the NFL, nor the Bears (5-5),  the most offensively inept, played this week. Barring almost inhumanly quick health improvement for San Francisco, it won’t come close to defending its NFC title, particularly in the NFC West, where everyone else decidedly isn’t mediocre.

As for Chicago, it’s not unreasonable to see the Bears go from 5-1 to the bottom of the NFC North, which other than Green Bay decidedly is mediocre.

New England might be the most disappointing of these underperformers, though losing the main reason it won six Super Bowls, Tom Brady, is significant enough to cause a major step backward.

Those who believed the Patriots were progressing after a down-to-the-wire win over the winless Jets and a home victory in nasty weather against a now-slumping Baltimore can’t be buoyed by Sunday’s defeat at Houston. Yes, a Texans club whose only two previous victories were over the second-worst team in the league, Jacksonville.

“It’s disappointing, but we’ll turn the page here and move on,” New England coach Bill Belichick said. “(I) still have a lot of confidence and belief in the team. If we just do things a little bit better, then the results will be different and better. But, I don’t know, we just couldn’t do it today.”

Nor on many other days in a 4-6 campaign.

Then there are the  Vikings, who started 1-5 before they won three straight division games. A home victory over the struggling Cowboys could have established Minnesota’s place in the playoff chase. Instead, inconsistency on both sides of the ball led to an ugly loss.


“There are positives to point to,” quarterback Kirk Cousins said, “but ultimately when you don’t win, you leave the stadium feeling sick to your stomach.”

Indeed, nausea often accompanies mediocrity.

Then there are the Falcons and Lions, really outsiders to join in the postseason chase even before Sunday. Atlanta had won three of four under interim coach Raheem Morris after an 0-5 start. So it lost to a quarterback making his first NFL start, Taysom Hill, and the Saints, in a relative blowout. The Lions were even worse, getting blanked for the first time in 11 years at Carolina, which broke a five-game slide using a QB also in his first NFL start, P.J. Walker.

Hill mainly has been a special-teamer and Walker’s last start was in the XFL.

“We have really good guys here,” embattled Lions coach Matt Patricia said when asked if he feels as though he’s losing the locker room. “We have guys who are fighting every day and working really hard. That’s the one thing – I just love this locker room. These guys are strong; they want to win. They’re trying to compete. They’re trying to do everything right.”

Maybe they are just too mediocre to achieve that.

Also stumbling in Week 11 was Miami, which had won five straight but lost at Denver. The Dolphins’ defense is for real, and they are well coached. But they lack maturity.

That said, they seem much more solid than the collection of current pretenders mentioned above.

Finally, there’s the case of the Cleveland Browns,  who are 7-3 and quite possibly headed to 10 or 11 victories and ending the league’s longest playoff drought — since the Browns’ only such appearance during their reincarnation, in 2002.

Philadelphia, one of those NFC East weaklings, pretty much handed the Browns their win Sunday. Other than taking down Indianapolis before the Colts began their turnaround, Cleveland has beaten the dregs of the NFL: Cincinnati twice, Washington, Dallas, Houston and Philly. None of those teams has won more than three times in 2020. The losses were against Pittsburgh, Baltimore and Las Vegas — all legit.

Ahead for the Browns are Jacksonville, the Giants and Jets, which all should be wins. Plus Tennessee, Pittsburgh and Baltimore, which based on the Browns’ track record, figure to be losses.

So being mediocre just might have its benefits.

___

More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

#1167
The scientific consensus might, of course, be wrong. If the history of science teaches anything, it is humility. But our grandchildren will surely blame us if they find that we understood the reality of climate change and failed to do anything about it.

Offline morefoolyou

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Re: perpetual NFL thread (the openPub version)…
« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2020, 03:06:43 PM »
The scientific consensus might, of course, be wrong. If the history of science teaches anything, it is humility. But our grandchildren will surely blame us if they find that we understood the reality of climate change and failed to do anything about it.

 

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